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Why do we need information about you?

We keep information about you to give you the best possible care.

We may use this information to:

  • make sure your care is of a high standard
  • plan services
  • check how well we are performing
  • help train staff and support research
  • fund your care

By law:

  • Everyone working with the NHS and social services must keep your information confidential
  • Everyone must keep your information secure and share it only when necessary
  • Wherever possible we will keep your information anonymous so that it cannot be linked to you

What sort of information do we hold?

We hold basic personal information such as your name, address and date of birth.

In addition, we hold information which may be classified as sensitive under the Data Protection Act 1998 – for example, information about your health, and details of any assessments or treatments that relate to your care.

How do we keep your information safe?

The Data Protection Act (1988) lays down eight principles that we must comply with when processing personal information. These state that personal information must be:

  • Processed fairly and lawfully
  • Processed only for specified purposes
  • Adequate, relevant and not excessive
  • Accurate and kept up-to-date
  • Not kept for longer than necessary
  • Processed in accordance with the rights of data subjects
  • Protected by appropriate security (practical and organisational)
  • Not transferred outside the European Economic Area (EEA) without adequate protection

This means that:

  • We will use your information only for the purposes for which we collected it
  • We will collect and keep only the information we require
  • We will keep it accurate and up-to-date (we may need your help for this)
  • We will keep it for a specified period of time, and then destroy it securely
  • We will recognise your right to see what information we are holding about you
  • We will keep your records safe and secure, so that unauthorised people cannot see them
  • We will not send your records abroad (unless you request it).

Seeing your records

If you wish to see your records, please contact the service in question. You can find all our services listed on the What We Do page. Each service gives details for how to Get In Touch.

How do we store your information?

Your information may be recorded on a computer system. Your information is stored securely, and only authorised staff can look at it. Some of our services are provided jointly and your information may be held as a single record, which is shared by all those involved in your care.

Apart from securely storing your information, all staff working with you have a duty to keep information about you confidential.

With whom might we share your information?

We will share relevant personal information about you on a need-to-know basis within the health care team (unless you object), to enable us to provide you with the best treatment. This also saves you from having to give the same information to several different people.

Several people and services may be working together to meet your needs. We may need to share your information in order for your care to be as seamless as possible. For example, we may need to share your information with hospitals and other health care providers if your care is to continue with them.

In certain rare circumstances (e.g. to protect other people or prevent crime), we may be legally obliged to share your information without asking for consent.

What can I do if I think information is wrong?

If you think any of the information we hold about you is wrong, please write to the service in question below to advise of exactly what you think it is wrong and why you think it should be changed. You can find all our services listed on the What We Do page. Each service gives details for how to Get In Touch.

If we agree that corrections are necessary we will make the changes. If, however, after reviewing it, we think the information is correct, we will let you know the reasons for this and note your concerns.

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